Do you schedule naps? How to be more productive.

By : Forum Moderator
Published 31st January 2019 |
Read latest comment - 6th February 2019

When are you most productive? We are all different and I have found that by recognising our own daily patterns we can become far more effective at running a business or even just in general everyday life.  

 

Your natural sleep/wake cycle is determined by your circadian rhythm, the internal 24-hour clock that governs when you are alert and when you are drowsy. A part of the brain called the hypothalamus controls this rhythm. Light also affects it because when it is dark around you, your hypothalamus signals the release of melatonin from your pineal gland, the hormone that helps us sleep. But beware, it also stops this release if it encounters light, so it is best to avoid putting lights on if you have to get up to pee in the night or you won't get back to sleep!

 When we are sleep deprived (waves to fellow parents and insomniacs) we feel these peaks and troughs of energy more strongly, so take note! The average person is least active/most sleepy between 2 and 4am and between 1 and 3pm, siesta anyone? The night-time dip in energy is when your body is in hopefully a deep sleep, and remember sleep is not only good for general rest, but it is when your immune system works, and various hormone levels regulate different body functions. Without good sleep you will find you get ill more often, and more stressed. Long term night-shift workers have higher incidences of heart disease and cancer and this is all linked to them going against their body’s natural circadian rhythm. Just think about how you feel with jet lag or with a newborn baby even, regular sleep matters, the circadian rhythm is easily disrupted. 

 

 If you are well rested, you may not notice the dip in energy in the afternoon but if you are tired (like I always am thanks to my children preferring my bed to their own) then it can hit you like a ten-ton truck. It varies a little for me, but my worst time is usually between 3 and 6pm. I am virtually useless then. Since having children, I can barely string a sentence together in the late afternoon. Then later in the evening I usually have a spring in my step again and often go to a pole fitness or yoga class and benefit from the energy surge. Work wise, mornings are very productive but if I try and proofread or write in the afternoon it takes hours to do one measly paragraph, so I avoid it when I can or focus on simple admin tasks that need doing or sometimes I take a nap!

 So, work out when you are most/least productive and tailor your working time accordingly. If you are brilliant in the mornings, then perhaps get up early and brainstorm or get started on a project and if you find late nights work for you then use them, but don’t do both… Make sure you schedule meetings for when you are most alert and try to avoid long drives if you know you will feel drowsy.  Tune into your body and create a far more productive day!

 

 

 

 

 


Thanks, Rebecca, Proofreader and Copywriter
The master of web copy.
Pay for Precision | Proofreading, copy-editing & copywriting.
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Comments

I think time is starting to become a more important and interesting topic, as our lifestyles and work become ever more flexible. Who said you need to work 9 - 5 to get your work done? We now live in a 24 hour society where youngsters are frustrated if their gadget takes longer than 24 hours to magically appear after ordering it.

So I love the idea of choosing the best time to be productive. Why sit there staring into space on a low battery, because convention dictates that you have to sit at your desk between set hours. The more you think about it, the dafter it sounds. Imagine a flexible work lifestyle which fits around your life and means your employer gets you at your maximum efficiency. Win win for everyone.

It's never going to work for all types of jobs, it would be nice to know the school teachers have turned up the same time as the kids, or the airline pilot sticks to an agreed schedule

But there are a multitude of jobs that could be infinitely more flexible than they are, and they reckon for the average school child, 25% of jobs haven't even been thought of or don't currently exist. Wouldn't it be great to start these new job types as completely flexible and optimised to be the most productive for employee and employer.


Steve Richardson
Gaffer of My Local Services
My Local Services | Me on LinkedIn

I totally agree, the fact I can be so flexible is why I love working for myself so much. I always hated 9-5 jobs. 

It's so strange thinking there will be all these new jobs we've never heard of yet. We will be sat in our armchairs ranting about the good old days! 


Thanks, Rebecca, Proofreader and Copywriter
The master of web copy.
Pay for Precision | Proofreading, copy-editing & copywriting.

I heard one the other day, someone was arguing against the case that car assembly jobs would disappear. Their argument was those jobs have by and large already long gone already due to automation from the 1980's onwards. 

The argument is the reverse is true, there will be a demand for more jobs because vehicle production will become more skilled as vehicles become more electronic and less mechanical. One of the skills in demand apparently will be cognitive engineers that will fine tune self driving cars. It will be an interesting future 


Steve Richardson
Gaffer of My Local Services
My Local Services | Me on LinkedIn

I was at a speed awareness course yesterday and they were talking about driverless cars as the trainer had been out in one on the Coventry ring road, as they test them round here. He said it was terrifying but amazing at the same time!


Thanks, Rebecca, Proofreader and Copywriter
The master of web copy.
Pay for Precision | Proofreading, copy-editing & copywriting.

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